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Stanley Sze Sze itibaren Beaverdale-Lloydell, PA, Birleşik Devletler itibaren Beaverdale-Lloydell, PA, Birleşik Devletler

Okuyucu Stanley Sze Sze itibaren Beaverdale-Lloydell, PA, Birleşik Devletler

Stanley Sze Sze itibaren Beaverdale-Lloydell, PA, Birleşik Devletler

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Bu kitabı seviyorum. Joyce saf bir parlaklıktır. Kelimelerle bir yolu var, sadece İngilizce olan bir İngiliz ustalığı. Yazma tarzı - genellikle bilinç akışı - insanları korkutabilir, ancak bu modernist edebiyatın mükemmel bir örneğidir. Bu, modernist hareketi çok daha fazla takdir etmemi ve anlamamı sağladı.

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Morty Martinez, Brooklyn'de genellikle ölümle boşalan evleri temizler, ancak Meksika'daki atalarının evine kaçmayı hayal eder. Temizlediği bir evde çok para bulduğunda, silahlı bir soygun suçlamasıyla on beş yıl geçirdikten sonra Sing Sing'den yeni serbest bırakılan Danny de dahil olmak üzere birçok insanın bir kesim yapmak istediğini fark ediyor. Danny parayı amcasının evinde saklamıştı ve amcası Danny'nin serbest bırakılmasından birkaç gün önce öldü. Ayrıca çetenin geri kalanını tutuklamayan ve ganimeti kullanabileceğine karar veren emekli bir polis ve Morty'nin tanışması için kendi yolundan çıkan çekici bir kadın var. Westlake gibi bir şey için jonesing, muhtemelen ihtiyacınız olan budur.

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A somewhat interesting and fairly well written account of the backround and political views of current president Barack Obama. The autobiographical aspects of this book were interesting, hearing about what it was like growing up for Obama, about his Kenyan father and white mother, about the values his mother instilled in him. He goes on to mention how he came to meet his wife and start a family with her, and some of the political work he's undertaken throughout his short career as a politician. This is definately the best part of the book, and it paints a picture of Obama as a much more interesting, real, and authentic figure than most American politicians. The parts of the book that I disliked the most was Obama's pathetic defense of religious moderation and patriotic sentimentality. Religous moderation is little more than half-assed religiosity which gives cover to religious extremism by reducing the conflict to a theological dispute. I tend to view patriotism as nausiating arrogance and national tribalism. Obama's gushing over how great America is did not change my view on this. To be fair to Obama, these are largely third rail political issues in American politics, and it probably would have been impossible for Obama to get elected to high office in this country if he was shouting "FUCK CHRIST" while pissing on an American flag. Another thing I didn't like was Obama's strategy for reforming health care. He thinks that we can have universal health care by simply introducing technology into the system. The improved efficiency this creates will, Obama thinks, make health care affordable to all Americans. This strategy, in combination with his critical statements on campaign trail about how socialized health insurance is coerced payment, makes it look like Obama is bending over backwards to accomodate a private health insurance policy. If this is not prostitution to private health insurance companies, then it shows undue deferance towards the presumptive justice of the idea that pretax income is rightfully "ours". Obama needs to read the Myth of Ownership. The final problem I had with the Audacity of Hope is Obama's biparitsan strategy for getting things done in Washington. Basically, Obama's strategy is one of compromise, of making concessions to conservatives, or what is sometimes referred to as going centrist on issues. I'm a thouroughgoing left wing liberal, and I hate the idea of ceding policy to ideological right wingers. Fuck that shit! On just about any aspect one would care to gauge, Obama is a welcome change to the abyssmal failure of the Bush administration. Practically everything about the man, from his backround, to his character, to his policies, will be a marked improvement over the Bush years. More importantly, he was clearly a better choice than the egregious stupidity and religious zealotry of Sarah Palin and the douchebaggery of McCain. America, and much of the world community will undoubtedly welcome the change Obama brings to the table.

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Omg I love this book! I am so excited yet so crushed that it's over. Really, truly great book. (You were right y'all!) Writer Alyson Noel does such a GREAT job of keep the reader on their toes, constantly engaged and wanting more. I was so frustrated with Damen's ambiguous nature that at times I was screaming at the pages "WTF, DAMEN!!!" Noel pulls you in, gives you a tiny morsel of satisfaction, then let's you hang on again, wanting just a bit more, always guessing. And at the end? The big reveal is so incredibly satisfying, like a long nap after a triathlon. There were so many moments where you think you know who Damen is, but you're so wrong. Noel's characters are so complex that it kept you interested through and through. Her world is original, yet with a hint of the familiar we all know and love. She has creating such new explanations and new ways of looking at the world that makes me want to jump in the pages and become, say, I don't know, Ever maybe? The relationships are beautiful and touching. Damen and Ever so lovely at times despite Damen's hot cold attitude. Riley and Ever's relationship left me crying at the end, completely heartbroken for her. Fans of "Twilight" will love this book. Beautiful love story but instead filled with deep well throughout characters and worlds and great writing. Noel has done a great job at portray the angst ridden teen, the in-love teen, and the emotional roller coaster of love and loss. I give this book a 10/10! Lovely and beautiful. Everyone needs to read it and have it forever on their bookshelves! Can't wait for the sequel (which you get a little tease for at the end of the book, Evermore)!

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J. A. T. Robison's 1963 best seller is a real gem. The finest book about rethinking God and the Christian faith I've ever had the privilege to read. Robinson's points are very simple: we must abandon the frankly unbelievable concept of a God "Out there," a supernatural person who is nothing more than a version of us writ large. Such a God is clearly no more than a psychological projection on our part. But this does NOT mean that we must abandon God. Robinson asks to conceive of God as “the ground of being”. God, for Robinson, is reality at its ultimate depth. The infinite power that brings all into being, and holds together all things. This reality is experienced primarily when we love and our loved. In Robinson's own words; "To assert that 'God is love’ is to believe that in love one comes into touch with the most fundamental reality in the universe, that Being itself ultimately has this character." (53). None of this is original to Robinson. The idea that God is not an "old man in the sky," but the infinite reality present everywhere has been voiced by many theologians and philosophers. But Robinson clarifies and explains the concept with a force that these others do not. Also interesting is Robinson's account of Jesus. Because he rejects all supernaturalism (he rejects naturalism as well), he cannot think of Jesus as essentially God in human form. The traditional idea of Jesus as a divine being with divine powers will not work for Robinson: "the traditional supranaturalistic [point of view:]... suggests that Jesus was really God almighty walking about on earth, dressed up as a man.... He looked like a man, he talked like a man, he felt like a man, but underneath he was God." (66). On this view Jesus becomes, Robinson tells us, a prince disguised as a beggar; the view must be rejected. Robinson's alternative is to remind us that love is the key to the divine ground of being, and that Jesus was the "man for others" who lived that love. In his embracing the outcasts, condemning the power structures that oppress and exploit, healing the sick, and declaring that all love and forgive each other as equal children of God, Jesus shows us the divine. Jesus is, for Robinson, the decisive revelation of God in a human life. And this means that existentially an encounter with Jesus is an encounter with God. Jesus, for Robinson is not different than us in kind, but only in degree. Jesus is fully human, totally one of us, yet he shows us God like no one else. Robinson also has fascinating chapters on prayer on ethics, and a marvelous account of the "worldly holiness" as opposed to "leaving the world." A great book, and I recommend it to anyone searching and questioning their spiritual life.